Week 26 chemo complete: Safe and sound in my bed

(flickr)

(flickr)

This photograph represents how I like to explain my Pomalyst chemo treatment using the analogy of wearing eyeglasses. I do not wear glasses myself. When someone is having vision problems, diagnosis
an eye doctor will test their vision and give them glasses so that they can see normally. The glasses can’t repair their eyes, salve they are simply an aid. If the glasses stop being effective, cure an eye doctor will give them a new prescription that hopefully will allow them to see correctly again.

The Pomalyst chemo I’m on isn’t to cure my cancer. That isn’t possible, my multiple myeloma + anemia is incurable. Instead, the objective is to stop my cancer levels from increasing. In a best case scenario, my cancer levels will remain low and stable indefinitely. If my cancer levels increase, this means that the chemo isn’t working anymore. I will then see my Hematologist and we will discuss other chemo options, that hopefully will be more effective in keeping my cancer levels low and stable.

Last week was much more challenging both mentally and physically as I’m finding that I’m constantly fatigued, which affects my memory and ability to get things done correctly. It isn’t so severe that I feel trapped in my bed or unable to move off my seat on the Canada Line. Instead, it is a continual level of tiredness that I feel throughout my body.

To recharge, during the day I take any opportunity I get to sleep/nap such as on public transportation. In the evenings I try and get to bed early, with the hope that the next day my fatigue won’t cause any major problems. This is a common side effect of my chemo treatment and a normal symptom of my cancer (multiple myeloma + anemia). I’m doing ok overall and focused on happy thoughts to get me through each day.

To recap: Last Sunday I completed Cycle 7 Week 1. I have Multiple Myeloma and anemia, a rare blood cancer. It is incurable, but treatable. From February to November 2013, I received Velcade chemo through weekly in-hospital injections as an outpatient. Since February 9th 2015, I have been on Pomalyst and dexamethasone chemo treatment (Pom/dex). On July 27th I began my seventh 28 day treatment cycle, 21 days on (4mg Pomalyst chemo pill), then 7 days off. I take 3 dexamethasone pills (4mg) every Monday.

Weekly chemo-inspired self-portraits can be viewed in my flickr album.

Week 25 complete: Why my chemo is like wearing eyeglasses

This photograph represents how I like to explain my Pomalyst chemo treatment using the analogy of wearing eyeglasses. I do not wear glasses myself. When someone is having vision problems, prescription
an eye doctor will test their vision and give them glasses so that they can see normally. The glasses can’t repair their eyes, ask
they are simply an aid. If the glasses stop being effective, link
an eye doctor will give them a new prescription that hopefully will allow them to see correctly again.

The Pomalyst chemo I’m on isn’t to cure my cancer. That isn’t possible, my multiple myeloma + anemia is incurable. Instead, the objective is to stop my cancer levels from increasing. In a best case scenario, my cancer levels will remain low and stable indefinitely. If my cancer levels increase, this means that the chemo isn’t working anymore. I will then see my Hematologist and we will discuss other chemo options, that hopefully will be more effective in keeping my cancer levels low and stable.

Last week was much more challenging both mentally and physically as I’m finding that I’m constantly fatigued, which affects my memory and ability to get things done correctly. It isn’t so severe that I feel trapped in my bed or unable to move off my seat on the Canada Line. Instead, it is a continual level of tiredness that I feel throughout my body.

To recharge, during the day I take any opportunity I get to sleep/nap such as on public transportation. In the evenings I try and get to bed early, with the hope that the next day my fatigue won’t cause any major problems. This is a common side effect of my chemo treatment and a normal symptom of my cancer (multiple myeloma + anemia). I’m doing ok overall and focused on happy thoughts to get me through each day.

To recap: Last Sunday I completed Cycle 7 Week 1. I have Multiple Myeloma and anemia, a rare blood cancer. It is incurable, but treatable. From February to November 2013, I received Velcade chemo through weekly in-hospital injections as an outpatient. Since February 9th 2015, I have been on Pomalyst and dexamethasone chemo treatment (Pom/dex). On July 27th I began my seventh 28 day treatment cycle, 21 days on (4mg Pomalyst chemo pill), then 7 days off. I take 3 dexamethasone pills (4mg) every Monday.

Weekly chemo-inspired self-portraits can be viewed in my flickr album.

Watching the sunrise at UBC on New Year's Day
Week 25 complete: Why my chemo is like wearing eyeglasses

This photograph represents how I like to explain my Pomalyst chemo treatment using the analogy of wearing eyeglasses. I do not wear glasses myself. When someone is having vision problems, view an eye doctor will test their vision and give them glasses so that they can see normally. The glasses can’t repair their eyes, they are simply an aid. If the glasses stop being effective, an eye doctor will give them a new prescription that hopefully will allow them to see correctly again.

The Pomalyst chemo I’m on isn’t to cure my cancer. That isn’t possible, my multiple myeloma + anemia is incurable. Instead, the objective is to stop my cancer levels from increasing. In a best case scenario, my cancer levels will remain low and stable indefinitely. If my cancer levels increase, this means that the chemo isn’t working anymore. I will then see my Hematologist and we will discuss other chemo options, that hopefully will be more effective in keeping my cancer levels low and stable.

Last week was much more challenging both mentally and physically as I’m finding that I’m constantly fatigued, which affects my memory and ability to get things done correctly. It isn’t so severe that I feel trapped in my bed or unable to move off my seat on the Canada Line. Instead, it is a continual level of tiredness that I feel throughout my body.

To recharge, during the day I take any opportunity I get to sleep/nap such as on public transportation. In the evenings I try and get to bed early, with the hope that the next day my fatigue won’t cause any major problems. This is a common side effect of my chemo treatment and a normal symptom of my cancer (multiple myeloma + anemia). I’m doing ok overall and focused on happy thoughts to get me through each day.

To recap: Last Sunday I completed Cycle 7 Week 1. I have Multiple Myeloma and anemia, a rare blood cancer. It is incurable, but treatable. From February to November 2013, I received Velcade chemo through weekly in-hospital injections as an outpatient. Since February 9th 2015, I have been on Pomalyst and dexamethasone chemo treatment (Pom/dex). On July 27th I began my seventh 28 day treatment cycle, 21 days on (4mg Pomalyst chemo pill), then 7 days off. I take 3 dexamethasone pills (4mg) every Monday.

Weekly chemo-inspired self-portraits can be viewed in my flickr album.

Watching the sunrise at UBC on New Year's DayJanuary 1, 2014: Watching a UBC Sunrise
Week 25 complete: Why my chemo is like wearing eyeglasses

This photograph represents how I like to explain my Pomalyst chemo treatment using the analogy of wearing eyeglasses. I do not wear glasses myself. When someone is having vision problems, order
an eye doctor will test their vision and give them glasses so that they can see normally. The glasses can’t repair their eyes, they are simply an aid. If the glasses stop being effective, an eye doctor will give them a new prescription that hopefully will allow them to see correctly again.

The Pomalyst chemo I’m on isn’t to cure my cancer. That isn’t possible, my multiple myeloma + anemia is incurable. Instead, the objective is to stop my cancer levels from increasing. In a best case scenario, my cancer levels will remain low and stable indefinitely. If my cancer levels increase, this means that the chemo isn’t working anymore. I will then see my Hematologist and we will discuss other chemo options, that hopefully will be more effective in keeping my cancer levels low and stable.

Last week was much more challenging both mentally and physically as I’m finding that I’m constantly fatigued, which affects my memory and ability to get things done correctly. It isn’t so severe that I feel trapped in my bed or unable to move off my seat on the Canada Line. Instead, it is a continual level of tiredness that I feel throughout my body.

To recharge, during the day I take any opportunity I get to sleep/nap such as on public transportation. In the evenings I try and get to bed early, with the hope that the next day my fatigue won’t cause any major problems. This is a common side effect of my chemo treatment and a normal symptom of my cancer (multiple myeloma + anemia). I’m doing ok overall and focused on happy thoughts to get me through each day.

To recap: Last Sunday I completed Cycle 7 Week 1. I have Multiple Myeloma and anemia, a rare blood cancer. It is incurable, but treatable. From February to November 2013, I received Velcade chemo through weekly in-hospital injections as an outpatient. Since February 9th 2015, I have been on Pomalyst and dexamethasone chemo treatment (Pom/dex). On July 27th I began my seventh 28 day treatment cycle, 21 days on (4mg Pomalyst chemo pill), then 7 days off. I take 3 dexamethasone pills (4mg) every Monday.

Weekly chemo-inspired self-portraits can be viewed in my flickr album.

Watching the sunrise at UBC on New Year's DayJanuary 1, 2014: Watching the first sunrise of the year
Week 26 chemo complete: Safe and sound in my bed

This photo represents the unknowns in my life as a multiple myeloma patient. One of my biggest concerns I have is that something serious will happen to me resulting in an extended stay in the hospital. During a previous chemo treatment I contracted a rare blood disorder called TTP was rushed to the ER and spend 12 days in hospital. So this possibility remains in the back of my mind each day.

I’m happy to state though, this site
that each night as I lie in my bed, this web
I don’t feel stressed or worried, I feel at peace. Another day is complete, I’m ready for tomorrow.

My weight remains about 20-25 pounds above pre-chemo weight due to the dexamethasone (oral steroid), which contributes to my ongoing fatigue. Overall I’m doing ok. Staying positive, loving photography, and happy for amazing friends!

To recap: Last Sunday I completed Cycle 7 Week 2. I have multiple myeloma and anemia, a rare blood cancer. It is incurable, but treatable. From February to November 2013, I received Velcade chemo through weekly in-hospital injections as an outpatient. Since February 9th 2015, I have been on Pomalyst and dexamethasone chemo treatment (Pom/dex). On July 27th I began my seventh 28 day treatment cycle, 21 days on (4mg Pomalyst chemo pill), then 7 days off. I take 3 dexamethasone pills (4mg) every Monday.

Weekly chemo-inspired self-portraits can be viewed in my flickr album.

End of the day on Granville IslandMay 2014: Granville Island

About tyfn

From December 2019 I've been on Darzalex (daratumumab) IV chemo with Velcade (Bortezomib) injection chemo + dexamethasone. Have Multiple Myeloma + anemia, a rare incurable cancer of the immune system. Life goal: To spread awareness about Multiple Myeloma through my self-portraits. UBC MSc Grad.
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2 Responses to Week 26 chemo complete: Safe and sound in my bed

  1. Willow Jones says:

    Hello Phillip,
    I’ve been following your blog since its inception and I admire you so because your medical and personal journey has not been easy. However, you continue to express yourself artistically capturing so beautifully the surroundings that grace the coastline of Vancouver.
    I am glad that your current chemo regimen is showing such promising results and I hope that you’ll soon acheive a remission status that continues for many years.
    Take care Phillip,
    Willow

    • tyfn says:

      Thanks Willow for following my blog and reaching out. I’m staying positive each day and focused on living as stress-free as possible so that I can minimize the side effects of chemo and maximize the effectiveness of treatment. Yes, I hope I remain in remission for many years to come.

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